Tribute to Architects of Abolition, Freedom and Liberation, Anniversary of Historical Dates of 1835 & 1855

Led by Joseph Edgecombe, Urban Historical Scholar

 New Trail-Location Discovers Boston Roots During the Abolitionist Revolution Era in American History and a Major Center of Abolitionist Boston.

Newly discovered historical site location, by Joseph Edgecombe, Urban history Scholar and trail announcement gives outstanding 19th Century version of the Boston’s (Colonial) freedom trail. The new trail explores the cross-section of Black, White and Women’s History Activity in the Abolitionist/Anti-Slavery movement’s era to bring about change in this country, in this All American Trail. After the American Revolution all was not great in these United States until Anti-Slavery Abolitionist emphasized and exercised their rights to meet and convene in public halls and their right to freedom of speech, without having their constitutional rights violated by being attacked by Proslavery mobs interrupting or breaking up their meetings. The central focus of the trail details the famous climactic event where The whole city was in an uproar and William Lloyd Garrison and The Boston Female Anti Slavery Society were forced to abandon a major meeting as the angry mob converged on the building –  and where Garrison was caught, roped and dragged through the street to be lynched by an angry mob to the original City Hall/the old State House (Southside- Near the same location where Crispus Attucks was shot down at the dawn of the American Revolution).

The women of the BFASS – Boston Female Anti-Slavery Society voted to relocate the meeting, and departed the building by the request of the Mayor Theodore Lyman, who with his constables escorted them out of the building, in a narrow line through the angry raucous mob to continue to hold their meeting at another historic location, they marched hand and hand 5-6 blocks away to relative safety on West Street between the Boston Common and Washington Street at the home of Maria Weston Chapman.

Abolitionist William Lloyd Garrison publisher of the Liberator newspaper  and speaker at the meeting would spend the rest of the night at the Leverett Street (near Charles St.) Jail it was the only place of safety to be found in the city.

The event came to be known as “The Boston Mob Riot of 1835” a mob of 5,000 men.

This dramatic event which happened in a public meeting hall at 46 Washington Street (at Cornhill) which came to be known as Stacy Hall, the event is one of the most storied episodes or epic topics of American history, 19th century Abolitionist and African-American related history in challenging America to change and end slavery as the country. 

Garrison founded the Liberator newspaper was in1831, New England Anti-Slavery Society was formed in 1832.  In 1833, William Lloyd Garrison, Arthur and Lewis Tappan, and others formed the American Anti-Slavery Society in Philadelphia, The Massachusetts antislavery society was formed by Garrison, The BFASS Boston female Anti Slavery Society was formed in 1834.

Joseph Edgecombe, Urban Historical Scholar, Email: Black-history@live.com

Six years before the 1835 event and outbreak at the meeting Hall at 46-48 Washington Street ( Stacy Hall)   which sparked and ignited the national abolitionist movement – in 1829 on Americas Independence day William Lloyd Garrison Gave his first profound statement and stand against slavery in America and spoke for the Freedom & Independence of the oppressed and enslaved inthe name of God.

Garrison’s Four Propositions, Introduced at Park Street Church:

1. Above all others, slaves in America deserve “the prayers, and sympathies, and charities of the American people.”

2. Non-slave-holding states are “constitutionally involved in the guilt of slavery,” and are obligated “to assist in its overthrow.”    

3. There is no valid legal or religious justification for the preservation of slavery.

4. The “colored population” of America should be freed, given an education, and accepted as equal citizens with whites.

Garrison’s Antislavery Address
Park Street Church, July 4, 1829

I call upon the ambassadors of Christ everywhere to make known this proclamation: ‘Thus saith the Lord God of the Africans, Let this people go, that they may serve me.’”
—William Lloyd Garrison, July 4, 1829.

Four decades before the United States Congress amended the Constitution to outlaw slavery, Park Street Church played a significant role in the American abolitionist movement. In 1823, Park Street began hosting an antislavery lecture series dedicated to raising funds for African missions. Held annually on Independence Day for six years, the series gathered many Bostonians in the spirit of benevolence towards “a long divided and suffering people.” At the conclusion of the series in 1829, organizers invited a twenty-three year old newspaper editor named William Lloyd Garrison to give the final lecture. In what was Garrison’s first public address, the famous abolitionist eagerly accepted the invitation and delivered a monumental speech from the Park Street pulpit. 

His address, entitled “Dangers to the Nation,” introduced a bold new approach to the antislavery effort. Referring to the words of the Declaration of Independence, Garrison declared America to be shamefully hypocritical for simultaneously celebrating the notion that “all men are born equal” while keeping two million slaves in “hopeless bondage.” He then charged all Americans with the moral obligation to demand an end to the “national sin” of slavery. “Let us, then, be up and doing,” he urged his listeners. “Sound the trumpet of alarm and plead eloquently for the rights of man.” By presenting four powerful propositions that laid the foundation for a new drive for emancipation, Garrison turned his afternoon lecture at Park Street Church into what historian Henry Mayer calls “an epochal moment in the history of freedom.”

To understand the significance of Garrison’s Park Street address, it is helpful to know that few Americans supported the abolitionist cause in the 1820’s. Though many believed slavery was wrong, there seemed no way to eradicate it without breaking apart the national Union. As a result, the vast majority took a stance of toleration and believed that the issue should be handled by the local rather than the federal government. Even in Massachusetts, where slaves were freed in 1781 and antislavery sentiment was strong, most citizens did not feel responsible for the practice of slavery outside their own state. Thus, anyone at the time who called for a national mandate to ban slavery in slaveholding states was considered a reckless extremist. For the most part, those who spoke against slavery advocated a policy of compensating slave masters and sending their freed slaves back to Africa where they could live in designated colonies.

After his Park Street Address, Garrison rose to national prominence as he continued to press hard for abolition. In 1831, he organized the New England Anti-Slavery Society, which demanded that slaves be immediately freed and treated equally with whites. That same year he established the famous abolitionist newspaper The Liberator, in which he announced, “On this subject, I do not wish to think, or speak, or write, with moderation…I will not retreat a single inch—and I will be heard.” Completely uncompromising and purposely inflammatory, Garrison attracted many angry critics in both the North and the South. Yet his tireless effort for emancipation and equal rights helped pave the way for the abolishment of slavery in 1866.

 
    Source: http://www.parkstreet.org/garrison_address

Joseph C. Edgecombe, June27th 2009 – Web Announcement

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Abolitionist Leader,Publisher & Speaker -William Lloyd Garrison was the First to make a critical address about Independence Day in America  in 1829 and what needed to be done to address slavery in the country to bring about True Freedom for all in America, Twenty-three years later  in 1852 Frderick Douglas Addressed the same topic in a speech as well.

Garrison’s Antislavery Address
Park Street Church, July 4, 1829

Garrison’s Four Propositions, Introduced at Park Street Church:

1. Above all others, slaves in America deserve “the prayers, and sympathies, and charities of the American people.”

2. Non-slave-holding states are “constitutionally involved in the guilt of slavery,” and are obligated “to assist in its overthrow.”    

3. There is no valid legal or religious justification for the preservation of slavery.

4. The “colored population” of America should be freed, given an education, and accepted as equal citizens with whites.

I call upon the ambassadors of Christ everywhere to make known this proclamation: ‘Thus saith the Lord God of the Africans, Let this people go, that they may serve me.’”
—William Lloyd Garrison, July 4, 1829.

Four decades before the United States Congress amended the Constitution to outlaw slavery, Park Street Church played a significant role in the American abolitionist movement. In 1823, Park Street began hosting an antislavery lecture series dedicated to raising funds for African missions. Held annually on Independence Day for six years, the series gathered many Bostonians in the spirit of benevolence towards “a long divided and suffering people.” At the conclusion of the series in 1829, organizers invited a twenty-three year old newspaper editor named William Lloyd Garrison to give the final lecture. In what was Garrison’s first public address, the famous abolitionist eagerly accepted the invitation and delivered a monumental speech from the Park Street pulpit. 

His address, entitled “Dangers to the Nation,” introduced a bold new approach to the antislavery effort. Referring to the words of the Declaration of Independence, Garrison declared America to be shamefully hypocritical for simultaneously celebrating the notion that “all men are born equal” while keeping two million slaves in “hopeless bondage.” He then charged all Americans with the moral obligation to demand an end to the “national sin” of slavery. “Let us, then, be up and doing,” he urged his listeners. “Sound the trumpet of alarm and plead eloquently for the rights of man.” By presenting four powerful propositions that laid the foundation for a new drive for emancipation, Garrison turned his afternoon lecture at Park Street Church into what historian Henry Mayer calls “an epochal moment in the history of freedom.”

To understand the significance of Garrison’s Park Street address, it is helpful to know that few Americans supported the abolitionist cause in the 1820’s. Though many believed slavery was wrong, there seemed no way to eradicate it without breaking apart the national Union. As a result, the vast majority took a stance of toleration and believed that the issue should be handled by the local rather than the federal government. Even in Massachusetts, where slaves were freed in 1781 and antislavery sentiment was strong, most citizens did not feel responsible for the practice of slavery outside their own state. Thus, anyone at the time who called for a national mandate to ban slavery in slaveholding states was considered a reckless extremist. For the most part, those who spoke against slavery advocated a policy of compensating slave masters and sending their freed slaves back to Africa where they could live in designated colonies.

After his Park Street Address, Garrison rose to national prominence as he continued to press hard for abolition. In 1831, he organized the New England Anti-Slavery Society, which demanded that slaves be immediately freed and treated equally with whites. That same year he established the famous abolitionist newspaper The Liberator, in which he announced, “On this subject, I do not wish to think, or speak, or write, with moderation…I will not retreat a single inch—and I will be heard.” Completely uncompromising and purposely inflammatory, Garrison attracted many angry critics in both the North and the South. Yet his tireless effort for emancipation and equal rights helped pave the way for the abolishment of slavery in 1866. 

http://www.parkstreet.org/garrison_address

Michael Jackson wil be missed by all and FYI he we was The G.O.A.T. the Greatest Of All Time, and the King of Pop Music. A true artist who took his art to thi highest level,which benefitrd the whole world.

For more on the Amazing Machael Jackson Please follow the link

MJ Live Website: http://www.michaeljacksonlive.com/video.php?vid=4#vid

London concert announcement: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=R3XqTDgX4Us

We Are the World: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=WmxT21uFRwM:

ANNOUNCEMENT:

THE MOVEMENT BEYOND REVOLUTION – THE EVOLUTION OF AMERICA

The 19th Century Movement By the People:

                        THE ARCHITECTS OF FREEDOM AND LIBERATION TRAIL          

 (The Liberators Trail – Boston’s Roots)

&

AMERICAS TRUE REVOUTIONARY PERIOD –

The Glorious Cause of the 19th Century

From Joseph C. Edgecombe, Urban History Scholar

___________________________________________________________

The 19th Century – The Evolutionary Years of America

Once upon a time in the United States of America, when the Country was still young, Patriotic Glory rose to a higher level of the responsibility of the activities and pursuits of Americas citizens – not the politicians but the people, America was not only divided between the states of the north and the south, but in the Rights and the Wrongs of a people in a thriving society and a growing nation. Therefore America needed a cause a Glorious Cause which would bring the society into  a much more Civilized State and Abolitionist and Anti-slavery proponents filled this need for America to strive for  a country where all are free to build their own futures. The new Visionaries of America struggled for the liberation and freedom of those that did not have it and rallied against those who took advantage of those freedoms. This was The Glorious Cause – A Visionary cause and philosophy led by Abolitionist – the people that would bring about A New Nation, A new republic and a new democracy for all – a society that is not just for the gentlemen of property and standing.

THE ARCHITECTS OF FREEDOM AND LIBERATION TRAIL (The Liberators Trail)

As Tribute to the Architects of Freedom and Country when The True Revolution was the Glorious Cause – The Intersection of Americas Crossroad to Freedom – Led by The Abolitionist.

Problems with Barack Obamas – White House Office of Urban Affairs

June 16, 2009

 Chisholm for President 1972    News Announcement of Presidential Candidate Shirley Chisholm     Shirley Chisholm - Americas First

Shirley Chisholm – Americas  and Catalyst for change and the Presidential founder of the change movement in America, She has received honorary doctorates from 31 institutions.

Barack Obamas Office of Urban Affairs – Should be dedicated or named in honor or 1972 Presidential Candidate Shirley Anita-Hill Chisholm.

Barack Obamas – new Office of Urban Affairs – Should be dedicated or named in honor or 1972 Presidential Candidate Shirley Anita-Hill Chisholm, for her valiant and unprecedented efforts to bring change to America during the politically dramatic, pressing and critical times of the early 1970’s.

She remains the Model Leader for many Americans across the country and across the world, but she has been practically assassinated by the American political-media complex and therefore needs to be properly recognized for hes contributions to this country and the world.

She is the unrecognized Change Agent and Trailblazer who broke all barriers for everyone in this country – towards the creation of the country which we all enjoy today.

She also fought for the equal rights and the equal rights amendment, It would only be right and just to complete her hard work by ratifying the equal rights amendment by amending the constitution of the United states of America…and yes the issue is an URBAN AFFAIRS and URBAN POLICY.

Joseph Edgecombe, F.A.C.T.S. – Prgressive Assoc.

Documentation on Shirley Chisholm: She has received honorary doctorates from 31 institutions.

       

 

 

 Chisholm for President 1972    News Announcement of Presidential Candidate Shirley Chisholm     Shirley Chisholm - Americas First

Shirley Chisholm – Americas  and Catalyst for change and the Presidential founder of the change movement in America, She has received honorary doctorates from 31 institutions.

Barack Obamas Office of Urban Affairs – Should be dedicated or named in honor or 1972 Presidential Candidate Shirley Anita-Hill Chisholm.

Barack Obamas – new Office of Urban Affairs – Should be dedicated or named in honor or 1972 Presidential Candidate Shirley Anita-Hill Chisholm, for her valiant and unprecedented efforts to bring change to America during the politically dramatic, pressing and critical times of the early 1970’s.

She remains the Model Leader for many Americans across the country and across the world, but she has been practically assassinated by the American political-media complex and therefore needs to be properly recognized for hes contributions to this country and the world.

She is the unrecognized Change Agent and Trailblazer who broke all barriers for everyone in this country – towards the creation of the country which we all enjoy today.

She also fought for the equal rights and the equal rights amendment, It would only be right and just to complete her hard work by ratifying the equal rights amendment by amending the constitution of the United states of America…and yes the issue is an URBAN AFFAIRS and URBAN POLICY.

Joseph Edgecombe, F.A.C.T.S. – Prgressive Assoc.

       

Biography & Documentation on Shirley Chisholm: She has received honorary doctorates from 31 institutions.

Shirley Chisholm Named Susan B. Anthony Professor

University of Rochester, March 31, 1994

Shirley Chisholm, the renowned leader in the fight for equal rights for women and minorities and the first black woman elected to the U.S. Congress, has been appointed to the distinguished Susan B. Anthony Professorship at the University of Rochester and will teach classes in the fall.

“Chisholm is a one-of-a-kind, authentic pioneer,” said William S. Green, undergraduate dean in the College of Arts and Science. “She brings to our campus a unique American experience, along with a gift for teaching. It is rare for students to have the chance to spend sustained time with someone who has actually helped create the world in which they live. We are honored and privileged to have her as part of our faculty.”

The former congresswoman has been named the Susan B. Anthony Professor for a two-month period next fall. During that time, she will teach “Women in Politics” (Political Science 246) with Nan Johnson, senior associate in the College of Arts and Science Dean’s Office, and adjunct associate professor of political science. Johnson will conduct the beginning and ending lectures, and Chisholm will lecture from the end of September to the end of November. To be offered Tuesday and Thursday afternoons next fall, enrollment for “Women in Politics” will be limited to 120 students.

In addition, Chisholm will teach a one-hour course on Wednesdays entitled “Black Women in America” with Sharon Fluker, assistant dean in the College of Arts and Science, and director of minority student affairs. The time of the course will be announced later.

Chisholm is also expected to give two major addresses during her residence at the University. Details on dates and topics aren’t yet available.

Chisholm’s political career began in the early 1950s in Brooklyn’s boss-run Democratic clubhouses, where she persistently challenged the inequities of machine politics. She came to be regarded as a troublemaking maverick, but one to be reckoned with, and eventually won election to the New York State Assembly in Albany. In 1968, Chisholm again beat the odds against her race and sex to win election to Congress and served until 1982, when she announced she would not seek re-election. She took a serious run at the presidency in 1972, becoming the first black woman to seek the nation’s highest office.

In the summer of 1993, Chisholm was nominated by President Clinton to serve as Ambassador to Jamaica, an honor she declined, choosing instead to continue her efforts through teaching and writing to gain equal rights for all Americans.

She is the author of two books, Unbought and Unbossed, her autobiography, and The Good Fight, the story of her 1972 bid for the presidency.

Chisholm has earned praise and awards for her efforts on behalf of black colleges, compensatory education, minimum wage for domestics, Native Americans, Haitian refugees, migrant farm workers, and the poor. She is the co-founder of the National Political Congress of Black Women, which she headed from 1984 to 1992.

She holds a bachelor’s degree from Brooklyn College, and a master’s degree and professional diploma in educational supervision from Columbia University. She has received honorary doctorates from 31 institutions.

“Shirley Chisholm brings a message of activism and hope to our students at the University of Rochester,” said Professor Celia Applegate, director of the Susan B. Anthony Center at the University. “In her life’s work she has shown the courage, dedication and vision that defined the life of Anthony.”                                                                                                                                                                                                             Source: http://www.rochester.edu/news/show.php?id=1221

January 28, 2005

Shirley Chisholm: Activist, Professor, and Congresswoman

Shirley Chisholm, who held the Purington Chair at Mount Holyoke for four years after retiring from the U.S. Congress in 1983, died January 1, 2005, in Ormond Beach, Florida, at age 80.

Chisholm was born in Brooklyn, New York, in 1924 and was sent to live with her maternal grandmother in Barbados in 1927. She returned to Brooklyn in 1934 and attended Girls High School in Brooklyn and Brooklyn College, where she began her lifelong battle against racism and social injustice.

After graduating in 1946 from Brooklyn College, she worked in day care and participated in local politics. She won a seat in the New York General Assembly in 1964 and was elected to the U.S. Congress in 1968. Chisholm was the first African American woman to serve in Congress. She was a staunch opponent of the Vietnam War and a cofounder of the National Organization for Women. She stated, “Women in this country must become revolutionaries. We must refuse to accept the old, the traditional roles and stereotypes.”

In 1972, Chisholm ran for president of the United States, declaring, “I am not the candidate of any political bosses or special interests. I am the candidate of the people.” She was the first African American — and the first woman — to seek nomination for president by a major political party, winning 151 delegates.

Chisholm retired from Congress in 1982. History professor Joseph Ellis, dean of faculty at the time, suggested to then president Elizabeth Kennan Burns that they invite Chisholm to teach at the College. At a series of initial meetings with the congresswoman on campus, Ellis recalled a group of students asking her for advice on becoming social activists. “Learn how to raise money,” she told them. Chisholm accepted the offer and came to Mount Holyoke in 1983 to teach politics and sociology.

“She contributed to the vitality of the College and gave the College a presence,” said Ellis. “Her message was always, ‘Blacks and whites need to do this together.'”

Chisholm received many honorary degrees and awards, including Alumna of the Year, Brooklyn College; Key Woman of the Year; Outstanding Work in the Field of Child Welfare; and Woman of Achievement.                                             Source:  http://www.mtholyoke.edu/offices/comm/csj/012805/chisholm.shtml